Does programmatic advertising have an alt-right problem?

Nov 22, 2016 6:46:11 PM

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Elections can be a tricky time for advertisers using programmatic strategies to reach a wider audience online. As a number of alt-right sites and blogs popped up over the course of the last election cycle, brands may have unknowingly advertised on sites that do not necessarily represent their corporate values. Digiday recently looked at the “fake news” sites that have been slowly sweeping through Americans' home computers and mobile phones to see if programmatic advertising is encouraging these sites to proliferate online.

Brands are not always aware of where their programmatic creatives are ending up online, and finding that information out from vendors often takes a lot of time. Ari Paparo, CEO of Beeswax, was quoted by Digiday stating,

“A marketer may use a whitelist, or a verification vendor to protect against running on objectionable sites, but it is an inexact science and a site that is offensive but not obviously a hate/porn/illegal site might pass unless someone is specifically looking to block it.” 

Few advertising intelligence tools have the technology to uncover not only where your programmatic creatives are appearing, but which partner placed them there. The ad daisy chain, or “path” as we call it, is an important auditing component to any media buyer’s position in ensuring creatives are running on contracted, safe sites. What differentiates a publisher as desirable vs. unwanted is up to the brand, as there may be a segment of their audience they are targeting. Transparency behind any ad buy is crucial to maintaining full control of your brand’s image online.  

See what other industry folks think in the full story on Digiday.

Image from Digiday.


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Jordan Kramer

Written by Jordan Kramer

An out-of-the-box thinker with a love for disruptive ideas, Jordan's background spans PR and events for the wedding & hospitality industry in Los Angeles and Scottsdale and also launching one of America's most unique food trucks. She jumped from the food start-up scene to the tech start-up scene in 2013 to join one of the most unique companies in ad tech. Jordan is a graduate of the University of California, Santa Barbara with a Bachelor of Arts in Communication.

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